Case Series
Volume 11 Issue 6 - 2020
Exudative Retinopathy Revisited
Abdulrahman A Alghadyan
Professor and Consultant Vitreoretinal, King Fahd University Hospital, Imam Abdulrahman University, Kahal Medical complex, Alkhober, Saudi Arabia
*Corresponding Author: Abdulrahman A Alghadyan, Professor and Consultant Vitreoretinal, Kahal Medical complex, King Fahd University Hospital, Imam Abdulrahman University, Alkhober, Saudi Arabia.
Received: April 06, 2020; Published: May 30, 2020




Abstract

Exudative retinopathy is not a disease by itself but a manifestation of a wide range of local and systemic conditions affecting the blood vessels. These conditions can be developmental, degenerative, infectious and inflammatory. The inflammatory conditions such as CSC, APMPPE and VKH which represent different spectrum of presentation. Exudative retinopathy is a sign of an underlying disease but not a disease in itself just like headache. The present cases support that there is an overlap between them; but the severity of the underlying cause may explain the difference in presentation.

Keywords: Exudative Retinopathy; VKH; APMPPE; CSC

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Citation: Abdulrahman A Alghadyan. “Exudative Retinopathy Revisited”. EC Ophthalmology 11.6 (2020): 01-25

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