Review Article
Volume 7 Issue 7 - 2020
COVID 19: Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Perspective
Balvir S Tomar1*, Deepak Nathiya2, Pankaj Kumar Singh3, Pratima Singh2, Supriya Suman2, Preeti Raj2, Sandeep Tripathi4 and Dushyant S Chauhan5
1Director - Institute of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Transplant, Nims University Rajasthan and President - International Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Transplant and Nutrition, India
2Department of Pharmacy Practice, Institute of Pharmacy, Nims University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India
3Department of Neurosurgery, National Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Nims University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India
4Institute of Nutrition and Public Health, Nims University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India
5Institute of Advance Sciences, Nims University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India
*Corresponding Author: Balvir S Tomar, Professor, Director and Head, Institute of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Nims University Rajasthan and President International Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Transplant and Nutrition, India.
Received: April 24, 2020; Published: June 24, 2020




Abstract

Since December 2019, nCOV becomes threat to world and due to this WHO declared this as Pandemic. As of today andgt;2.6 Million confirmed cases along with andgt;182,000 deaths has been reported so far. Clinical symptoms include varieties of Pulmonary and extra pulmonary viz Pneumonia, Cough, diarrohoea. COVID-19 cause large number of changes in biochemical profile of individual who is suffering from it includes lymphocytopenia, high creatinine levels, high blood urea and significant effect on various inflammatory factors. RT-PCR method of testing stands as Gold standard for testing of COVID-19. Liver and Gastrointestinal features are much prevalent in COVID-19. Further number of drugs are under investigation /or their efficacies are yet to establish in COVID-19. Hypoxia plays important role in worsening of COVID-19 which must be controlled by monitoring Silent Hypoxia by Pulse Oximeter so that morbidities leading to mortalities can be minimized. Elderly patients must be given special care for prevention of COVID-19 among them. Further in this review we will be summarizing various effect on Hepatic and Gastrointestinal involvement in COVID-19, and preventive measures to be taken against spread of COVID-19 Pandemic.

Keywords: SARS-CoV2; Liver; Gastrointestinal; AST; ALT; Hypoxia

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Citation: Balvir S Tomar., et al. “COVID 19: Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Perspective”. EC Gastroenterology and Digestive System 7.7 (2020): 63-77.

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